Ken

The 6 Foods That Kill Bad Bacteria In Your Gut

Published: Aug-2013
Written By: Ken

Here is the third video in your 4 video series on good bacteria & bad bacteria.

This one deals specifically with what you can start doing today to increase the amount of good bacteria in your gut, while starving the bad bacteria that causes fat gain, a weak immune system, diarrhea, muscle pain, inflammation, fatigue, constipation, gas, bloating, acid reflux, indigestion, skin problems, bad breath and tons more.

Yogurt does a lot more damage to your gut than it helps a majority of the time because of what it contains and how it was made.

Now, there are certain types of yogurts that are really great for your gut health, one of the six foods mentioned in the video below.

Please leave your comments below the video. Your feedback is helpful and appreciated.

 


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14 comments
m zaman
m zaman

I am a diabetes patient from last ten year my sugar level 140 to 160 fasting 180 to 220 random but now I'm feeling weakness burning foot my wait is 115 kg   and my wife is have high bp 170/110. Give us comments.

remember when 1980
remember when 1980

So far I can't eat Yogurt???? it seems like your selling supplements that's not what I signed up for spending more money.

lobsang namgyel
lobsang namgyel

Im in India and cant watch videos so a written summary of videos would help.

reverendministerladyk
reverendministerladyk

If I have to consume so much of fermented food

items daily why eat them at all and not just use a

Supplement?

gmarymusicmaker
gmarymusicmaker

I am lactose intolerant. Kefir , being a fermented milk product, would not be good for me. Am I correct?

Dwaine Cassidy
Dwaine Cassidy

A video doe's not do me any good.  I am deaf even with my hearing aid in as far as speakers and phones are concerned.   Could someone write this out for me.  I would love to read it.

Darryl61
Darryl61 moderator

@m zaman  Hi! I'm so happy to see your interest in the information I enjoy sharing. I'm kinda of confused though about your question. What is it you were wanting to know?

Darryl61
Darryl61 moderator

@remember when 1980  Sorry for the misunderstanding. We NEVER said that it is not good to eat yogurt. It is just that as far as eating yogurt for probiotics, there are a few things to consider. First, be sure that the label shows that it contains "live cultures" or "probiotics", but on the other hand, even if listed in the ingredients, pasteurization can kill off some of the good bacteria it contained.


The second thing to consider is whether or not the yogurt you're eating contains sugar. The "bad" bacteria feeds off of sugar (even the natural sugar found in fruit), which can cause an imbalance when the bad bacteria start to thrive. To be certain that you're getting what you think you're getting, it's best to choose unsweetened (whether natural sweetened with fruit or sugar derivatives, such as high fructose corn syrup, for example). Even if you chose those sweetened with artificial sweeteners, you may contend with negative effects of the chemicals they contain.


Other dietary sources of probiotics are kefir, sauerkraut, pickles, kombucha and kimchi, for example. Adding a good probiotic supplement is also good if you are unable to get what you need from dietary sources, but it's always a good idea to check with your doctor to see what's best for you.

Darryl61
Darryl61 moderator

@lobsang namgyel  We do not have a transcript of the video, however if you need a technical assistance in viewing the video, feel free to contact our customer support at tickets@paleoburn.com

Leslie777
Leslie777 moderator

@reverendministerladyk

It’s always best to get your nutrients from quality, organic food sources. However every individual has their own sense of taste, and some may not eat enough of the necessary foods (or any at all), therefore a supplement would be a good option.

Leslie777
Leslie777 moderator

@gmarymusicmaker

Kefir, while a fermented milk product, can also be made with coconut milk as a nondairy alternative. 

Also, the lactose (sugar) found in dairy products is converted to lactic acid by the cultures found in kefir and yogurt, thereby reducing the original amount of lactose found in the dairy.

If you make your own kefir, you can control the amount of time the milk is cultured, which reduces the amount of lactose (and increases the amount of lactic acid, which makes for a tangier flavor). Once matured, you can further "ripen" the kefir to decrease the lactose to a minimum. The longer the milk is cultured, the more lactose is removed.

However, it's best to talk to your doctor to see what option is safest for you personally. :)

Leslie777
Leslie777 moderator

@Dwaine Cassidy

Here are the links for each video presentation. When you click on each link, you’ll see a closed caption option (“cc”) in the lower right corner of the screen. This will enable you to read the script for each presentation. (This is what the screen will look like: http://www.screencast.com/t/NcYcq8X6EfA)

I hope this is helpful. Best wishes. :)

KenBurge
KenBurge moderator

@Leslie777 @reverendministerladyk  I also wanted to chime in on this question as well. For some people, like myself for example, its just a matter of the time I have available. I don't always have time to make fermented food and knowing that no matter what I get the probiotic support I need via the daily supplement is very reassuring.